This week is a special Favorite Friend Friday featuring LEBDV’s new Chair of the Board of Trustees, PDG Earl Groendyke! Earl has been a part of the Lion’s Club since 1983 and has held various important positions during his time as a Lion. He has served as both Vice President and President of his local Lion’s Club, and eventually became a District Governor. After his time as District Governor, Earl became part of Lions Eye Research Foundation to help raise money for the research of eye diseases. Earl describes his fellow Lions as being very dedicated and supportive of each other and loves to be surrounded by such great people.

Earl was initially drawn into the Lion’s Club by his two brothers. They are both visually impaired and have some struggles with everyday life like being unable to obtain a driver’s license. He is proud to be part of an organization that can help individuals gain the gift of sight. Earl considers the most inspiring aspect of his work to be hearing the personal stories of both donors and transplant recipients. He believes there is a greater force than people can comprehend that creates the donor and transplant recipient relationships. Earl hopes that donation, especially cornea transplants, will receive more awareness and individuals will not take their sight for granted.

Earl is very excited for his transition from Board Member to Chair of the Board. While he is aware of the upcoming challenges that Covid-19 has brought to procedures at LEBDV, he is confident that with his talented Board Members and the amazing staff, there is nothing the Eye Bank cannot do.

When he is not working with the Lions, Earl enjoys spending time with his family, including his wife, two daughters, and four grandchildren. He is passionate about cars and has been the president of the Dodge Brothers Club for the past four years. Earl was in the Marine Reserves for six years and attained the rank of Sergeant. He spent most of his career as a mason, eventually becoming a Master Mason, and even opened his own business for masonry work in 1979.

Being a Lion is about leading by example, building relationships and improving the world through kindness; Earl Groendyke definitely embodies all of these characteristics, and we are so honored to have him as the next Chair of the Board!

Thank you for all you do, Earl!

Written by Tara Korch

We are so honored to introduce Vicki Piccotti,an active part of LEBDV and a cornea transplant recipient, as this week’s Favorite Friend Friday! Vicki is a caring and compassionate individual which is exemplified through her dedication to her two children and life-long career as a registered nurse. Vicki worked for 45 years in various medical environments such as a senior care facility, a family practice and as a nurse at the school her children attended. Vicki is a talented skier and previously taught ski lessons at Shawnee Mountain. Currently, she is a part of Big Boulder Mountain’s ski patrol.

Vicki struggled with a virus infection in her left eye for many years and received consistent treatment for it. In 2011, she found out her cornea was so thin it could rupture, and had her first transplant scheduled within weeks. With no recovery issues, the first surgery went smoothly and her vision improved to 20/20 post surgery. A year later, Vicki had cataract surgery. In 2017, the infection came back, and Vicki had a partial transplant done; the second transplant proved to be a more difficult recovery, which led to Vicki’s third transplant in 2018. Although it was another challenging recovery process, serum tears—eye drops made from one’s own plasma—helped heal her eye after the third transplant.

Vicki is a strong and resilient woman who has embraced the challenges of her long transplant journey. There were many difficulties within her second and third transplant, but she did not let that affect her spirit. After her second transplant, Vicki went straight to Switzerland to ski the alps, despite having her eyelid glued shut for healing! Although she still struggles with her depth perception and driving in the dark, Vicki’s vision is mostly back to normal.

Vicki learned about Lion’s Eye Bank through her incredible eye surgeon, Dr. Hannush. After visiting the office for a tour, she was able to find information about her donor and saw the process come full circle. Vicki is so inspired by the incredible work accomplished at Lion’s Eye Bank and was especially impressed by the touching story of LEBDV providing cornea tissue to Simeon Edwards in Jamaica.

Vicki and her family try to support Lion’s Eye Bank whenever possible. She went to Salt Lake City in 2018 for the Transplant Games of America; the best part of Vicki’s experience was meeting people from around the world and across the country while spreading the positive effects that are the result of organ donation and transplantation. During the games, Vicki and her husband won six gol medals and two silver medals for ballroom dancing!

Understanding the importance of saying “yes” to organ donations, Vicki wants the community to know that although it is devastating when a loved one passes away, that person will live on by giving someone else the gift of sight or even life. Vicki is extremely grateful to her donor and her donor family for saying “yes” to donation during such a difficult time. Being a life-long health care worker, Vicki is certainly pro-donation and encourages everyone to speak up about eye, tissue and organ donation.

We are so honored to introduce Vicki Picotti,an active part of LEBDV and a cornea transplant recipient, as this week’s Favorite Friend Friday! Vicki is a caring and compassionate individual which is exemplified through her dedication to her two children and life-long career as a registered nurse. Vicki worked for 45 years in various medical environments such as a senior care facility, a family practice and as a nurse at the school her children attended. Vicki is a talented skier and previously taught ski lessons at Shawnee Mountain. Currently, she is a part of Big Boulder Mountain’s ski patrol.

Vicki struggled with a virus infection in her left eye for many years and received consistent treatment for it. In 2011, she found out her cornea was so thin it could rupture, and had her first transplant scheduled within weeks. With no recovery issues, the first surgery went smoothly and her vision improved to 20/20 post surgery. A year later, Vicki had cataract surgery. In 2017, the infection came back, and Vicki had a partial transplant done; the second transplant proved to be a more difficult recovery, which led to Vicki’s third transplant in 2018. Although it was another challenging recovery process, serum tears—eye drops made from one’s own plasma—helped heal her eye after the third transplant.

Vicki is a strong and resilient woman who has embraced the challenges of her long transplant journey. There were many difficulties within her second and third transplant, but she did not let that affect her spirit. After her second transplant, Vicki went straight to Switzerland to ski the alps, despite having her eyelid glued shut for healing! Although she still struggles with her depth perception and driving in the dark, Vicki’s vision is mostly back to normal.

Vicki learned about Lion’s Eye Bank through her incredible eye surgeon, Dr. Hannush. After visiting the office for a tour, she was able to find information about her donor and saw the process come full circle. Vicki is so inspired by the incredible work accomplished at Lion’s Eye Bank and was especially impressed by the touching story of LEBDV providing cornea tissue to Simeon Edwards in Jamaica.

Vicki and her family try to support Lion’s Eye Bank whenever possible. She went to Salt Lake City in 2018 for the Transplant Games of America; the best part of Vicki’s experience was meeting people from around the world and across the country while spreading the positive effects that are the result of organ donation and transplantation. During the games, Vicki and her husband won six gol medals and two silver medals for ballroom dancing!

Understanding the importance of saying “yes” to organ donations, Vicki wants the community to know that although it is devastating when a loved one passes away, that person will live on by giving someone else the gift of sight or even life. Vicki is extremely grateful to her donor and her donor family for saying “yes” to donation during such a difficult time. Being a life-long health care worker, Vicki is certainly pro-donation and encourages everyone to speak up about eye, tissue and organ donation.

 

Written by Tara Korch

This week’s Favorite Friend Friday features a charismatic LEBDV employee who has an incredible passion for Lion’s Eye Bank. Holly Wright is the current administrative coordinator and has been working for LEBDV since October of 2017. Holly has many responsibilities at LEBDV such as keeping the database updated with all constituents, sending out acknowledgement letters of financial donations, assisting in the execution of the tremendous events at Lion’s Eye Bank, and so much more. Holly has a love for both performance and studio arts and was a teacher in the religious and private pre-school sector prior to working at LEBDV.

Holly first applied to LEBDV because its mission resonated with her after her son, Nathan (pictured in the graduation cap and gown), had a cornea transplant in August of 2017. Nathan’s transplant tissue was from Lion’s Eye Bank, so she was connected to the organization even before she started working there. Nathan, as well as the rest of her family, volunteer to help the eye bank whenever possible.

Holly believes the most rewarding aspect of her job is seeing the gratitude letters on the wall at the office of LEBDV. She admires the communication and connection between the families of the donors and the transplant recipients through hand-written letters; the letters allow the donor families to know their loved one is appreciated and remembered. Having written a letter on behalf of her son to his donor’s family, she understands the value of the gratitude letters.

Although Holly finds all aspects of LEBDV’s mission important, the most meaningful aspect to her is that Lion’s Eye Bank provides quality tissue for all recipients despite the financial status of the recipient. It was important to her that her son would receive tissue that worked for him, and she can attest that LEBDV always provides quality tissue regardless of an individual’s ability to pay. Holly’s favorite moments have been at the past Cornea Transplant Recipient Luncheons because the event brings together cornea recipients, donor families, volunteers and staff, and is an amazing opportunity to share stories and experiences.

Holly sincerely hopes that the future of non-profit eye banking continues to succeed and be relevant in all communities.

Thank you for all you do for LEBDV, Holly!

 

Written by Tara Korch

Join us for our 26th Annual Gift of Sight Charity Golf Classic!

October 27, 2020

Proceeds from this event directly benefit community members who cannot afford a cornea transplant. With your gift, we will continue to provide hope and quality care for those in need.

Join us with your foursome for this fun-filled day of fellowship, golfing, and a chance to take home some great prizes from our silent and raffle auctions. Invite non-golfers to join you for dinner!

Click here for information and to sign up!

Today’s Favorite Friend Friday is someone who has completely changed LEBDV for the better and opened the doors to so many recipients and donor families.

Jerilyn Giardina, a Shippensburg University alumna, has been with Lions Eye Bank of Delaware Valley for five years. Prior to her arrival, the eye bank did not have much communication with recipients. Jerilyn realized how impactful personal stories could be for people and began involving recipients more and more.

Jerilyn created the recipient kits that all eye surgeons now have in their offices. These kits get sent home with recipients post transplantation to help educate them about the eye bank, where their tissue came from, and how to reach out to their donor family.

Through these recipient kits, we have met countless of incredible recipients and donor families and listened to their inspiring stories that would have otherwise went unheard.

Jerilyn has also worked tirelessly on creating impactful events that really emphasis the life-changing impact of corneal transplantation. The Annual Cornea Transplant Recipient Luncheon is one of these events. Next month will be the fifth year of this incredible event where recipients and donor families come together to share stories and learn from one another.

From the annual forSight newsleter to the Phillies tailgates, we could go on and on about all of Jerilyn’s amazing work and how much she means to this organization.

Jerilyn is currently at home with her beautiful baby boy, Elliot Henry Giardina! She and her husband, Nick, welcomed Elliot into the world on Wednesday, February 19, 2020. We could not be more happy or excited for her and her family.

Thank you for all you do for this organization every single day Jerilyn! We can’t wait to see you and Elliot very soon!

This week’s Favorite Friend Friday is a recipient we first met when she reached out to her donor’s family. Julie Hart, from Dowingtown, PA, is a mom of three and a software test engineer. Fittingly enough, she is also the daughter of Lion Charlie Hennessey from the Eagleville-Trooper Lions Club. Her life took a turn she would never forget in March of 2015.

“I scratched my cornea while using contacts which caused an ulcer in my eye,” Julie recalls. She started out at her local ophthalmologist but was soon referred to a corneal specialist in West Chester. Her regimen of constant eye drops continued to no avail, and was finally sent to Wills Eye Hospital in June 2015 where she was officially diagnosed with acanthamoeba, a rare corneal disease.

By the time Julie got to Wills Eye, the infection had been persisting for three months already. “I had no vision out of my left eye,” Julie remembers of that time. “Prior to my infection I was driving a school bus part time, but now I had to stay at home. I was so sensitive to light—I couldn’t go outside, be on the computer, watch TV. I no longer could do any of the things I used to enjoy. It was debilitating.”

Almost a year after the initial infection, in February of 2016, Julie received a cornea transplant in her left eye. Since then, she has been able to get back to a normal routine, spending time with her family and friends, and going back to work. We are all so excited to have her as our guest speaker at District 14-P’s Sight Night next month!

“Don’t hesitate to think about donating,” Julie says as she thinks about the selfless gift a stranger gave to her. “It is so valuable and so appreciated.”

This week’s Favorite Friend Friday is a celebrity in the world of ophthalmology. Any patient of Chris Rapuano, MD can attest to his incredible work ethic, personality, and skills. Dr. Rapuano has been a member of the Medical Advisory Board of Lions Eye Bank of Delaware Valley since 1991. He attended college at Brown University, medical school at Columbia University, completed his residency at Wills Eye Hospital from 1987-1990 and a Corneal Fellowship at the University of Iowa from 1990 to 1991.  Since 1991 he has been on staff in the cornea department at Wills Eye Hospital. He is Chief of the Cornea Service at Wills Eye Hospital and a Professor of Ophthalmology at Sidney Kimmel Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University. He is also the author of several books, numerous book chapters, and more than 150 articles in the peer-reviewed literature on corneal disease, refractive surgery, and excimer laser PTK surgery. During his ophthalmology residency, Dr. Rapuano co-authored the best-selling textbook in ophthalmology, The Wills Eye Manual. 

 

I had the pleasure of getting to sit down with Dr. Rapuano last week to learn a little more about his life and work. This is hist story:

 

“Growing up, no one in my family was a Doctor, so I didn’t know much about the medical field. My father was a Dentist, he liked being able to fix things and take care of problems, so going into medical school I thought I wanted to be a surgeon. By my third year of school however, I knew that ophthalmology was for me.” Dr. Rapuano explains when asked if he always knew he wanted to be an ophthalmologist.

 

Not all ophthalmologists come to specialize in corneas and go on to be the Chief of the Cornea Service Department. Dr Rapuano explains that there were two specific things that drew him to corneas. “First off, you could just look at the slit lamp and see what was going on with a cornea. You didn’t need a lot of other testing or dilating. I appreciated the visual analysis cornea docs could do to make a diagnosis. Second, I liked the delicacy of cornea surgery and the positive results for patients afterward.”

 

Continuing with the idea of positive patient results, Dr. Rapuano explains exactly what it is that makes his job so rewarding. “As cornea surgeons, we have the ability to change people’s lives, sometimes quickly and sometimes not as quickly. From removing the corneal opacity from a baby to treating corneal swelling from Fuchs dystrophy to performing emergency corneal transplant for a severe infection or cornea perforation, we can make a real and lasting difference. That’s why I come to work every day.”

 

A large part of Dr. Rapuano’s job is working with and treating young children born with various eye disorders, one being Peters Anomaly. “The kids that we treat are a very special group. They are the most appreciating and satisfying patients to work with but are also some of the most heartbreaking when the surgeries don’t work out.” Dr. Rapuano tells the story of a young boy he first met at 3 months old who he worked with for many years. Eventually it became apparent that his vision was not going to improve at all, and he still remembers this 8 or 9 year old’s response when Dr. Levin gave him this news. The young patient replied, “It’s OK, I’m so happy for what you’ve done because I’ve been able to see my mother’s beautiful face for the past 5 years.”

 

When Dr. Rapuano is not improving lives and restoring vision, he is spending time with his wife and kids. He has four children, 3 boys and a girl, all of whom have worked either at his office or at Wills at some point in their lives. His second oldest son Pat, actually worked for a summer in High School as a recovery technician for LEBDV, and is going to be starting his residency at Wills Eye this July! His wife Sara has been helping out with Give Kids Sight Day at Wills Eye for about ten years, and now fully runs the event.

From all of us at Lions Eye Bank, and all of your patients, thank you so much for all that you do Dr. Rapuano, you are so appreciated!

 

This week for Favorite Friend Friday we have the honor of sharing the story of Rickey Colomy Jr. 3rd. Rickey was a bright light and a beacon of hope for everyone whose path he crossed. We will always remember his life and legacy. Over the years we have grown very close with Rickey’s mom, Dawn Ortiz. The story shared below is an excerpt from our interview with her a few years ago. We thought this would be a meaningful and impactful way to begin the New Year. This is Rickey’s story:

Remembering Rickey

“If this could help another child to not have to go through what I do than let’s do it,” Dawn remembers hearing Rickey say. “Where and when” was Rickey’s philosophy as he offered his blood, saliva and time participating in research studies at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). “He was always thinking about other people and never expected anything in return,” says Dawn.

Richard Scott Colomy Jr. 3rd, who everyone called Rickey, was born with vascular malformation. As part of Rickey’s life-long care at CHOP, he had endless doctor’s appointments, follow-up visits, surgeries and therapies.

“Something that impressed me about my son was that nobody knew he was sick. If you didn’t know his circumstances, you would never know. With as much as Rickey had gone through, intense and invasive surgeries, it can take a toll on someone’s body and mind but he always smiled. I think that’s what always captivated people. The nurses and surgical coordinators would say that his smile was infectious.”

On January 13, 2015 Rickey had surgery number 18. It took longer than expected. When he was finally in recovery, Rickey came out smiling, but seemed concerned. “He told me that something was different, but couldn’t explain what it was.”

As part of recovery, Rickey was on injections twice a day. He was sore, but that was to be expected. One to never sit around, Rickey began leaving the house again.  He went out to visit his girlfriend and called to check in that night. “I said I love you buddy. He said I love you too Momma”, recalls Dawn. “That was the last time I talked to my son.”

Rickey suffered from a pulmonary embolism and passed away in the middle of the night.

Rickey had a wide range of friends. He never judged people. He accepted everyone. “I didn’t realize how many people relied on Rickey,” Dawn recalled. “There was a young lady that Rickey was friends with since grade school. Her family didn’t have a lot of money and her medication would upset her stomach. She would get nauseous from taking her medication on an empty stomach and so she wouldn’t take it. This young girl truly needed her medication. I found out later that Rickey would bring this girl chips and soda every day to homeroom to make sure she would take her medicine. He had a profound impact on that young lady.”

Rickey was a beautiful, kind and caring soul. Before Rickey passed away he introduced his mother to his friend’s father. “He kept asking me to go out with him, I remember thinking what is wrong with him,” recalls Dawn. After attempting to cancel on a coffee date, Rickey pleaded that she go. John made Dawn the happiest she had been in a long time and Rickey loved him. “Rickey introduced me to my husband,” says Dawn. “He made sure that I was taken care of before he left.”

Dawn honored her son’s wishes to donate his corneas. “It was his decision that he made solely on his own,” says Dawn, “I wasn’t surprised he wanted to be a donor. I couldn’t be more proud, I couldn’t be more pleased. Giving back is Richard.” Rickey’s eyes saved the sight for two individuals.

“Child loss will truly rip you from everything that you are.  It’s been a long journey I but I continue to hear Richard in my ear because after every surgery that Richard would have which was very intense and very invasive,  I would always say to him you don’t give up you keep fighting you keep going and that is what I keep hearing in my head. ‘Don’t give up keep fighting you’re not a quitter.’ And the days when I feel like I can’t get out of bed those are the words that I hear. It’s hard, I do struggle, but then I think of Richard and I know I have to get up today.”

Friday, July 03, 2020

This week is a special Favorite Friend Friday featuring LEBDV’s new Chair of the Board of Trustees, PDG Earl Groendyke! Earl has been a part of the Lion’s Club since 1983 and has held various important positions during his time as a Lion. He has served as both Vice President and President of his local Lion’s Club, and eventually became a District Governor. After his time as District Governor, Earl became part of Lions Eye Research Foundation to help raise money for the research of eye diseases. Earl describes his fellow Lions as being very dedicated and supportive of each other and loves to be surrounded by such great people.

Earl was initially drawn into the Lion’s Club by his two brothers. They are both visually impaired and have some struggles with everyday life like being unable to obtain a driver’s license. He is proud to be part of an organization that can help individuals gain the gift of sight. Earl considers the most inspiring aspect of his work to be hearing the personal stories of both donors and transplant recipients. He believes there is a greater force than people can comprehend that creates the donor and transplant recipient relationships. Earl hopes that donation, especially cornea transplants, will receive more awareness and individuals will not take their sight for granted.

Earl is very excited for his transition from Board Member to Chair of the Board. While he is aware of the upcoming challenges that Covid-19 has brought to procedures at LEBDV, he is confident that with his talented Board Members and the amazing staff, there is nothing the Eye Bank cannot do.

When he is not working with the Lions, Earl enjoys spending time with his family, including his wife, two daughters, and four grandchildren. He is passionate about cars and has been the president of the Dodge Brothers Club for the past four years. Earl was in the Marine Reserves for six years and attained the rank of Sergeant. He spent most of his career as a mason, eventually becoming a Master Mason, and even opened his own business for masonry work in 1979.

Being a Lion is about leading by example, building relationships and improving the world through kindness; Earl Groendyke definitely embodies all of these characteristics, and we are so honored to have him as the next Chair of the Board!

Thank you for all you do, Earl!

Written by Tara Korch

Friday, June 19, 2020

We are so honored to introduce Vicki Piccotti,an active part of LEBDV and a cornea transplant recipient, as this week’s Favorite Friend Friday! Vicki is a caring and compassionate individual which is exemplified through her dedication to her two children and life-long career as a registered nurse. Vicki worked for 45 years in various medical environments such as a senior care facility, a family practice and as a nurse at the school her children attended. Vicki is a talented skier and previously taught ski lessons at Shawnee Mountain. Currently, she is a part of Big Boulder Mountain’s ski patrol.

Vicki struggled with a virus infection in her left eye for many years and received consistent treatment for it. In 2011, she found out her cornea was so thin it could rupture, and had her first transplant scheduled within weeks. With no recovery issues, the first surgery went smoothly and her vision improved to 20/20 post surgery. A year later, Vicki had cataract surgery. In 2017, the infection came back, and Vicki had a partial transplant done; the second transplant proved to be a more difficult recovery, which led to Vicki’s third transplant in 2018. Although it was another challenging recovery process, serum tears—eye drops made from one’s own plasma—helped heal her eye after the third transplant.

Vicki is a strong and resilient woman who has embraced the challenges of her long transplant journey. There were many difficulties within her second and third transplant, but she did not let that affect her spirit. After her second transplant, Vicki went straight to Switzerland to ski the alps, despite having her eyelid glued shut for healing! Although she still struggles with her depth perception and driving in the dark, Vicki’s vision is mostly back to normal.

Vicki learned about Lion’s Eye Bank through her incredible eye surgeon, Dr. Hannush. After visiting the office for a tour, she was able to find information about her donor and saw the process come full circle. Vicki is so inspired by the incredible work accomplished at Lion’s Eye Bank and was especially impressed by the touching story of LEBDV providing cornea tissue to Simeon Edwards in Jamaica.

Vicki and her family try to support Lion’s Eye Bank whenever possible. She went to Salt Lake City in 2018 for the Transplant Games of America; the best part of Vicki’s experience was meeting people from around the world and across the country while spreading the positive effects that are the result of organ donation and transplantation. During the games, Vicki and her husband won six gol medals and two silver medals for ballroom dancing!

Understanding the importance of saying “yes” to organ donations, Vicki wants the community to know that although it is devastating when a loved one passes away, that person will live on by giving someone else the gift of sight or even life. Vicki is extremely grateful to her donor and her donor family for saying “yes” to donation during such a difficult time. Being a life-long health care worker, Vicki is certainly pro-donation and encourages everyone to speak up about eye, tissue and organ donation.

We are so honored to introduce Vicki Picotti,an active part of LEBDV and a cornea transplant recipient, as this week’s Favorite Friend Friday! Vicki is a caring and compassionate individual which is exemplified through her dedication to her two children and life-long career as a registered nurse. Vicki worked for 45 years in various medical environments such as a senior care facility, a family practice and as a nurse at the school her children attended. Vicki is a talented skier and previously taught ski lessons at Shawnee Mountain. Currently, she is a part of Big Boulder Mountain’s ski patrol.

Vicki struggled with a virus infection in her left eye for many years and received consistent treatment for it. In 2011, she found out her cornea was so thin it could rupture, and had her first transplant scheduled within weeks. With no recovery issues, the first surgery went smoothly and her vision improved to 20/20 post surgery. A year later, Vicki had cataract surgery. In 2017, the infection came back, and Vicki had a partial transplant done; the second transplant proved to be a more difficult recovery, which led to Vicki’s third transplant in 2018. Although it was another challenging recovery process, serum tears—eye drops made from one’s own plasma—helped heal her eye after the third transplant.

Vicki is a strong and resilient woman who has embraced the challenges of her long transplant journey. There were many difficulties within her second and third transplant, but she did not let that affect her spirit. After her second transplant, Vicki went straight to Switzerland to ski the alps, despite having her eyelid glued shut for healing! Although she still struggles with her depth perception and driving in the dark, Vicki’s vision is mostly back to normal.

Vicki learned about Lion’s Eye Bank through her incredible eye surgeon, Dr. Hannush. After visiting the office for a tour, she was able to find information about her donor and saw the process come full circle. Vicki is so inspired by the incredible work accomplished at Lion’s Eye Bank and was especially impressed by the touching story of LEBDV providing cornea tissue to Simeon Edwards in Jamaica.

Vicki and her family try to support Lion’s Eye Bank whenever possible. She went to Salt Lake City in 2018 for the Transplant Games of America; the best part of Vicki’s experience was meeting people from around the world and across the country while spreading the positive effects that are the result of organ donation and transplantation. During the games, Vicki and her husband won six gol medals and two silver medals for ballroom dancing!

Understanding the importance of saying “yes” to organ donations, Vicki wants the community to know that although it is devastating when a loved one passes away, that person will live on by giving someone else the gift of sight or even life. Vicki is extremely grateful to her donor and her donor family for saying “yes” to donation during such a difficult time. Being a life-long health care worker, Vicki is certainly pro-donation and encourages everyone to speak up about eye, tissue and organ donation.

 

Written by Tara Korch

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